“Transcendence” & “Rise of the Guardians” illustrate the fine art of …

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When something is transcendent, it's supposed to " … be far better or greater than what is usual." Well, that's clearly not what happened with "Transcendence" this past weekend. At least when it comes to this Warner Bros.

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“Transcendence” & “Rise of the Guardians” illustrate the fine art of …

Fine Art of FUN | The Official Eureka Springs Visitor's Blog

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Every year in the spring Eureka Springs celebrates the creative uniqueness of hundreds of artists who call Eureka Springs home. Fanciful parades, colorful shops, gallery walks, creative cuisine, and live music in Basin Spring Park are just some of the events that introduce visitors to the fine art of fun.

Here are some tips for the best way to enjoy your time in our artistic town:

Park at the top of Planer Hill and ride the trolley around town. It is a great way to get acquainted. Keep your eye out for several of the public art pieces displayed throughout town.

Grab a gallery guide so you don’t miss any art galleries in town. Watch for special openings with wine and cheese receptions in May.

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Fine Art of FUN | The Official Eureka Springs Visitor's Blog

Fine Art Conceptual Photography by Christine Muraton | Fine Art …

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Christine Muraton was born in 1988 in France. Lives and works all around the world. After completing her studies in French literature, Christine decided to become an itinerant photographer. She wanted to see the world through her own eyes after having perceived it through texts.

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Fine Art Conceptual Photography by Christine Muraton | Fine Art …

Fine Art: 'Education', Right | Kotaku Australia

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Concept artist and illustrator Kat Nicole Berkley has worked for companies like Irrational, Epic, 38 Studios and Big Huge Games. You can see more of Kat’s work at her personal site.

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios.

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Fine Art: 'Education', Right | Kotaku Australia

The Fine Art of Spinning Things | Colossal

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From the thick of a Brazilian forest to the bustling streets of Taiwan, not to mention a lazy spot in the French countryside, here are three videos of extremely talented people spinning objects with their hands. The first is juggler Gustavo Ollitta who is manipulaing sets of striped blades (called buugengs and triple buugengs) that create a dizzying illusion that appears to warp space and time. The next is a recent video from performer Lindzee Poi who demonstrates something called an amelymeloptical illusion (which, Google as I might, I am unable to define exactly what that means, but apparently it’s this, and it’s amazing). Lastly, two young men from Taiwan take the mindless habit of spinning a pen on your hand to an entirely new level. (via The Kid Should See This, DDN Japan, Devour)

Update: An “amelymeloptical illusion” is a play on words. Blending the title of the movie Amélie (the video uses music by Yann Tiersen from the 2001 film) with the French word la méli-mélo which roughly translates to the “mish mash” or “hodgepodge”. Thanks Brigitte and Kevin.

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The Fine Art of Spinning Things | Colossal

Fine Art: The Future Of War Is So Bright You Have To Wear Shades …

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Dmitriy Rabochiy is a character artist currently doing some work with Blur. Over the last few years, he’s mainly done stuff for games, mobile and film.

You can see more of Dmitriy’s work at his personal site.

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios.

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Fine Art: The Future Of War Is So Bright You Have To Wear Shades …

Ned Vena at Real Fine Arts (Contemporary Art Daily)

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Artist: Ned Vena

Venue: Real Fine Arts, New York

Exhibition Title: Paintings Without Borders

Date: March 8 – April 21, 2014

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Real Fine Arts, New York

Press Release:

Real Fine Arts is pleased to present Paintings Without Borders, Ned Vena’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. In a series of 10 white monochrome paintings Vena continues an involvement with material behavior and meaning. The monochromes are made by rolling layer over layer of Rustoleum white enamel paint on top of a stencil of straight lines. In addition to the monochromes are a series of 5 paintings in which Vena has exchanged his hard-edged abstract motifs for graphic imagery. The imagery comes from leftover digital files from completed sign contracts. Moonlighting as a vinyl sign-maker, Vena utilizes the vinyl cutting machine that he employs to make stencils for his paintings for a client base composed primarily of other artists. He runs this business simultaneously alongside his painting practice. Taking and repurposing images created by clients of his sign business, these paintings illustrate a breach of trust rather than a gesture of appropriation. Procedurally they are identical to previous works and many of the same phenomena occur within the material interaction in these works.

A shaped canvas is a canvas that is somehow neither a square nor a rectangle. A shaped canvas could be viewed as having been trimmed from the borders of a quadrangular shape, a more typical painting surface. The remaining picture is inhibited by this paring. Due to the specificity of the shape, the capital letter G in Collegiate Black font, these paintings can be read literally. The G is a repeated letter, a repeated symbol. It has the straight lines and angles of modern shaped canvasses, such as Frank Stella’s “Telluride” or “Pagosa Springs”. If anything they acknowledge the missing picture plane where the painting could have occurred and interrupt the continuity of the processes and images whose execution they have sustained. Despite these absences, however, they are treated as normal surfaces and painted. The graphic images are removed from their original use, and superimposed into a shape. The edges of the paintings have been meticulously taped.

All of this is to be viewed on a surface of soft rubber, not unlike the rubber of the paintings, typically used as padding to support the knees and backs of people working on their feet.

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Ned Vena at Real Fine Arts (Contemporary Art Daily)

Bachelor of fine arts graduation exhibition and opening gala – UBC's …

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Graduating bachelor of fine arts student Kylie Miller prepares for Ellipsis, the 2014 year-end BFA Graduation Exhibit on April 19th. Photo Credit: Alia Popoff. WHO: UBC's bachelor of fine arts graduating students majoring in …

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Bachelor of fine arts graduation exhibition and opening gala – UBC's …

Fine Art: Titanfall Fish Markets Struggling For Business | Kotaku …

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It’s been two years since we last showcased the art of James Paick. In that time, he’s worked on projects like Titanfall, so it’s time to take another look.

I love this kind of Titanfall art. Yeah, the giant robots and spaceships are cool, but this environmental stuff does a better job than the game itself of giving you the sense the universe is alive, and not just a series of combat arenas.

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios.

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Fine Art: Titanfall Fish Markets Struggling For Business | Kotaku …

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